Nephrolithiasis

From Libre Pathology
(Redirected from Bladder stones)
Jump to: navigation, search

Nephrolithiasis, commonly known as kidney stones, are solids that form in the kidney. They can be found anywhere in the genitourinary tract. Bladder stones redirects here.

Classic types

  • Calcium oxalate - most common.[1]
  • Uric acid.
  • Struvite.
  • Cystine.

Notes:

  • Memory devices:
    • Diamonds are see-through; ergo, uric acid stones not seen on KUB.
    • Calcium oxalate = envelope, uric acid = diamond.
  • Uric acid crystals: usually dissolve in formalin... but do not dissolve in alcohol.[2]
  • Calcium oxalate crystals are seen in the context of ethylene glycol poisoning.[3]

Images

Sign out

Compatible with bladder stone

URINARY BLADDER (QUERY STONE), BIOPSY:
- TRANSLUCENT CRYSTALS THAT ARE WHITE/LIGHT BLUE WITH POLARIZED LIGHT, CALCIFICATIONS
  (CONSISTENT WITH CALCIUM PHOSPHATE) AND ABUNDANT COCCI MICROORGANISMS, SEE COMMENT.
- NO DEFINITE UROTHELIAL MUCOSA IDENTIFIED.
- NO EVIDENCE OF MALIGNANCY.

COMMENT:
The findings are compatible with a bladder stone.
Submitted as "Bladder Stone", Removal:
- Consistent with urinary bladder stone (gross only).

See also

References

  1. López, M.; Hoppe, B. (Jan 2010). "History, epidemiology and regional diversities of urolithiasis.". Pediatr Nephrol 25 (1): 49-59. doi:10.1007/s00467-008-0960-5. PMID 21476230.
  2. Geddie, W. 8 January 2010.
  3. Saukko, Pekka; Knight, Bernard (2004). Knight's Forensic Pathology (3rd ed.). A Hodder Arnold Publication. pp. 589. ISBN 978-0340760444.
  4. URL: http://www.kidneypathology.com/English_version/Diabetes_and_others.html. Accessed on: 21 March 2014.