Aspergillosis

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Aspergillus with classic fruiting heads. H&E stain.

Aspergillosis is a fungal infection due to Asperillus.

General

  • Due to Aspergillus.
  • Fungus.
  • Associated with immunosuppression/immunodeficiency.
    • Rarely in immune competent individuals.[1]

Microscopic

Features:

  • Hyphae that branching with 45 degrees angle - key feature.[2]
    • Uniform width - typically ~3-5 μm.
  • Septated - often difficult to see.
  • "Fruiting heads" when aerobic - uncommon.
    • Spherical structures ~50 micrometres in diameter with radially arranged structures (like spokes of a wheel) +/- an empty centre in the plane of section.

DDx:

Images

www:

Stains

See also

References

  1. Sugimura, S.; Yoshida, K.; Oba, H.; Hashiguchi, K.; Nakajima, M.; Moriya, O.; Okimoto, N.; Niki, Y. et al. (Oct 1994). "[Two cases of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in non-immunocompromised hosts].". Nihon Kyobu Shikkan Gakkai Zasshi 32 (10): 1032-7. PMID 7844909.
  2. Lefkowitch, Jay H. (2006). Anatomic Pathology Board Review (1st ed.). Saunders. pp. 682. ISBN 978-1416025887.
  3. URL: http://path.upmc.edu/cases/case290.html. Accessed on: 14 January 2012.
  4. Guarner, J.; Brandt, ME. (Apr 2011). "Histopathologic diagnosis of fungal infections in the 21st century.". Clin Microbiol Rev 24 (2): 247-80. doi:10.1128/CMR.00053-10. PMID 21482725.
  5. URL: http://www.ispub.com/journal/the-internet-journal-of-otorhinolaryngology/volume-6-number-1/maxillary-sinus-mycetoma-due-to-aspergillus-niger.html. Accessed on: 27 February 2012.